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Reversing Democracy

It took thousands of years to get democracy as a method to elect the government. Out of 100 odd countries where democracy exists in some form or another, very few countries succeeded in constitutionally implementing democratic moralities.

Credit: The Economists | 2017


After Europe and USA, India is the only country in Asia where the federal system of parliamentarian government rules the country which gets elected by a greater sense of democratic values in the election methods. The idea of equal representation of every class, caste, creed, culture, and community into the parliament of India has been best served constitutionally. This is not so perfectly formed even in the USA. 

We must thank our forefathers who have devoted so much time and hard works to make the constitution which ensures freedom for every one of us. Not even the USA had the right to vote for women until 1981. India had implemented the law of universal adult franchise since the very first general election in India in the year 1952. 

Our first general election was not easy, while we were copying the electoral process from the west. Our social fabric was not as much aware as Europe was. We had no electors record or voter lists back then. We had no roads, bridges, and maps to ensure everyone’s participation in the election. Even we had no mechanism to figure if the person has voted or not voted or if have voted twice. Our first chief election commissioner Shri Sukumar Sen had ideated the indelible blue ink to mark the finger of the voter. Custody, safety, security and surety of ballot box was another major challenge in a country where all national highways were under the watch of regional bandits or dacoits.

Today, after 67 years of our first election, India is facing its biggest challenge. This is the reason I am talking about democracy today because tomorrow we may not have any elections in India ever after 2019. We all are murdering our democracy, we are tearing apart our constitution. We are going back to tyrannical slavery… this may be the last time someone is able to write an article about the freedom we so relinquished.  

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जाने क्या क्या

"ये अचानक बढ़ी कौतुहल का ग़ुबार भर है, कविता कह देना बड़ी बात होगी, पेश है आपके नज़रो-क़रम के लिए "
कुछ मीठा मीठा छूट गया, कुछ कड़वा कड़वा साथ रहा। 
उसके आने जाने तक का, जाने क्या क्या याद रहा।
फूल, किताबें, मंदिर ओटलें, वो गली गलीचे गुजर गये।
भीड़ भाड़ कि धक्का मुक्की, में ये शहर बड़ा आबाद रहा।
सायकल, गच्छी, सीठी, घंटी, छुप छुप के संवाद किये।
अब आँखों की अठखेली का, न वो हुनर रहा न उन्माद रहा।
कुछ मीठा मीठा छूट गया, कुछ कड़वा कड़वा साथ रहा। 
उसके आने जाने तक का, जाने क्या क्या याद रहा।
- जितेंद्र राजाराम


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